Skip to main content
site header image

Digital Images: Copyright and Citation Resources

This guide has been designed as a starting point for locating and using online images.

Copyright

The use of images for teaching and scholarly research generally falls under the category of "fair use." The terms of fair use states that, in an educational context, the payment of fees or permission is not required from copyright owners.

For more information, the Visual Resources Association (VRA) has published a Statement on Fair Use of Images for Teaching, Research, and Study. This statement is a guideline and should not be considered a legal document.

There are different rules for publishing images. If you are using images for publication, you must determine if they are in the public domain, or are protected by copyright.

The Visual Resources Association have also developed a Digital Image Rights Computator (DIRC) to help users assess the intellectural property status of a particular image so they can make informed decisions about the intended educational use of an image.

Image from an Electronic Source

Images, diagrams and artistic works should be cited as any other type of workGive as much information as possible about the image used, including these basics:

  • creator's name (author, artist, photographer etc.)

  • date the work was published or created

  • title of the work

  • place of publication

  • publisher

  • type of material (for photographs, charts, online images)

  • website address and access date

  • name of the institution or museum where the work is located (for artworks and museum exhibits)

  • dimensions of the work (for artworks)

APA Style Examples for Images - University of Maryland

Source

Reference List Citation

Library database

Rousseau, H. (1896). The ship in the storm [Painting]. Retrieved from Oxford Art Online database.

Free Web

Rousseau, H. (1896). The ship in the storm [Painting]. Retrieved from http://www.uwm.edu/~wash/rousseau.jpg

Image reproduced in a printed source

Rousseau, H. (1896). The ship in the storm [Painting]. Henri Rousseau: Jungles in Paris. By Claire Fresches et al. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art. 232.

The plate/image number (or, if this number is not available, the page number on which the image is printed) should follow the name of the publisher as shown.

More info

MLA Style Examples for Images - University of Maryland

Source

Works Cited List

Library database

Rousseau, Henri. The Ship in the Storm. 1896. Painting. Musee de l'Orangerie, Paris. Grove Art Online. Web. 22 Nov. 2006.

Free Web

Rousseau, Henri. The Ship in the Storm. 1896. Painting. Musee de l'Orangerie, Paris. Web. 8 Aug. 2006.

The collection which owns the image should be included in your citation along with its location as shown above.

Image reproduced in a printed source

Rousseau, Henri. The Ship in the Storm. 1896. Painting. Musee de l'Orangerie, Paris. Henri Rousseau: Jungles in Paris. By Claire Fresches, et al. Washington: National Gallery of Art, 2006. 232. Print.

More info

Rousseau's Ship in the Storm

Ship in a Storm, by Henri Rousseau, Circa 1896, oil on canvas, 1844-1910, 54x65 cm.

The Ship in the Storm by Henri Rousseau

Credit: Peter Willi

Creative #: 91610889

France, Paris, Musee del' Orangerie


Details
Collection: SuperStock
Max file size: 5,857 x 4,776 px (19.52 x 15.92 in) - 300 dpi - 18.2 MB
Release info: No release required

 

Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a non-profit that offers an alternative to full copyright

Attribution means:
You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work - and derivative works based upon it - but only if they give you credit.

Noncommercial means:
You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work - and derivative works based upon it - but for noncommercial purposes only.

No Derivative Works means:
You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it.

Share Alike means:
You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work.

Public Domain Dedication (CC0) means:
You, the copyright holder, waive your interest in your work and place the work as completely as possible in the public domain so others may freely exploit and use the work without restriction under copyright or database law.

Public Domain Work means:
Works, or aspects of copyrighted works, which copyright law does not protect. Typically, works become part of the public domain because their term of protection under copyright law expired, the owner failed to follow certain required formalities, or the works are not eligible for copyright protection.

Davis Library Resources

Jenkins Center

Gary Lesko at the Jenkins Center in the Rhodes Student Center

The Jenkins Center for Student Success offers assistance with citing resources.

Citing Tools

Computer generated citation tools might not be always correct. Be familiar with your citation manual and look for errors.